Money Tips for Teaching In Argentina: Learn About The "Blue Market"


By Lindsay Campher Krasinski

So, you are thinking about teaching English in Argentina?  Learning about financial practices - from banking to giving tips - is a basic part of moving abroad, and nowhere is that more of the case than in Argentina. Understanding the Blue Market is a must before you go and could help you get more out of your money and out of your experience teaching English in Latin America

What is the Blue Market?

I’m an advisor, not an economist so I will try to make this article as simple and straight forward as I can.

Simply, the Blue Market is where you go in Buenos Aires to get the highest exchange rate for the foreign currency that you bring with you - in many countries, it might be considered the "black market." It's not technically legal or monitored by authorities, but it operates in the open and changing money in the Blue Market is considered routine.

The Argentinian Peso has fluctuated greatly in recent decades, and compared to the U.S. dollar, has lost approximately 90% of its value the past 10 years (officially).  Argentinians have experienced their bank accounts worth go up and down on a financial roller coaster and the weakness of the peso in global markets has led Argentinians to value the American dollar over the Argentinian peso. Bottom line: people want U.S. dollars!

Teaching English Abroad: Essential Travel Resources

By John Bentley & Stéphane Le Mentec

Teaching English abroad provides a viable, affordable and realistic way for almost any native or fluent English speaker to gain employment and enjoy the experience of living in a foreign country. At the same time, the endeavor of moving, living, working and traveling abroad requires research and planning, and matters like travel arrangements, visas, health concerns and safety.

There are loads of great resources, to help you plan and prepare for your adventures abroad.  Here are some of our top picks.

7 Tips for Saving Money While Teaching English Abroad

 

The rewards of living, traveling and teaching English overseas cannot be measured in dollars, cents, euros or yen, but for most of us, financial concerns are a reality and we want and need to save money to pay bills, reach goals and to make the most of our lives.  Here are 7 great tips for how you can make the make the most financially out of your experience teaching English overseas.

What Are Basic Start-up Costs for Teaching English Abroad?

How Much Will it Cost Me to Teach English Abroad?


To move anywhere whether it is from New York to New Jersey or Chicago to Madrid, you’ll probably need to incur at least some basic start-up costs.

Depending on where you decide to teach English abroad, these costs will vary with the cost of living where you teach, travel expenses and whether you receive benefits like free housing and/or airfare from the school that employs you. For most people who teach English abroad, start-up costs typically include: