Bilingual Korean Professors, Privilege of English Speaking Countries, and Planning for Life after ESL

By: Ryan Thompson

Random Story From a Random Day Living in Yeosu, South Korea

I was invited to visit an island off the Southern Coast of South Korea.  The Korean teacher, who invited me, had basic conversational English skills; which is better than most in this small countryside city.  The last thing I expected was a day of fluent English conversation.  We met up with a group of Koreans. I was the only Westerner and the only one under thirty.    Within the group were a few Koreans that grew up in South Korea, but emigrated to the United States. One of them was the definition of eccentric. He had worked as a professor in several universities throughout Canada and along the east coast of the states East Coast of the States.  I couldn’t help but marvel at the history he had lived through.  He had been a child during WWII, lived through the Korean war when it was a third world country; he had watched South Korea rise to almost top 10 economies in the world. Then, he moved to Canada and the United States to teach philosophy.

Part-Time Online English Teacher & Part-Time Explorer in Da Nang, Vietnam!

By Polly Clover

Summers off, Winter Break, coloring, and singing songs. That is what many say being a classroom teacher in the states is all about. I know firsthand that this is not the case. While I felt fulfilled and joyful many days, I also found myself feeling exhausted and discouraged. After five years of working very long hours at an embarrassing salary, I decided it was time for a change.