Teaching English in Al Ain, United Arab Emirates (U.A.E.): Alumni Q&A with Carmen Oswalt


What is your citizenship?


United States

What city and state are you from?

Indianapolis, Indiana

How old are you?

27

What is your education level and background?

Bachelor's Degree

Where are you teaching English abroad?

I teach English in Al Ain in the United Arab Emirates (UAE).

What Are Salaries for English Teachers in the Middle East?

By Michael Kunik

Stretching from the western shores of North Africa across the Sahara to the Levant, the Arabian Peninsula and into the heart of Central Asia, the Middle East is a vast and diverse region not only from the standpoint of its cultures and geography, but in terms of the opportunities it offers certified English teachers as well.

In the wealthy Arab nations of the Persian Gulf region, English teachers can command some of the highest salaries and finest benefit packages in the world and must compete in a competitive job market. Often schools in this region of the Middle East will require English teaches to have a Master’s Degree (sometimes in education) and previous teaching experience, on top of their TEFL certification. That's not to say it's impossible for first-time teachers to get a job in this region (especially in Saudi Arabia), but you will need to be persistent, patient and flexible in your job search. Those who qualify for such positions will enjoy some of the highest salaries in the field as pay can range from $2,500 - $6,000 a month, plus free housing and flights to and from the teacher’s home country.

Famous TV Characters & Where They Would Teach Abroad

By Tyler Parsons

Recently we took a look and shared 15 celebrities who took the leap to teach English abroad before they were famous (we’re not saying teaching English abroad will make you famous— unless you can act like Ed Norton or make a living pranking Dwight) and it got us thinking a bit.

What if fictional TV characters had the choice to teach English abroad? Would they jump on the opportunity, and if so, where in the world would they teach? And since there is no wrong answer here, we figured we would take an educated guess or seven.

Teach English in the World’s Richest Country: Qatar

Destination 2022: Qatar

Want to teach English in the world's richest country?

According to the CIA World Factbook and Forbes, the Arabian nation of Qatar holds the title of the "richest country of the world," boasting an annual average per capita income of $103,768.60. For a little perspective, that's more than double the average annual per capita income in the United States!

Discover the Modern Middle East While Teaching English in Dubai

 

If there is a place in this world where all that is imaginable can come true, it may not be Disney's Magic Kingdom, or even Las Vegas, but rather the Emirate city-state of Dubai where the motto seems to be  “if you can think it, it shall be done”.

Here, immense wealth and creative planning and development have produced a city that boasts the world’s tallest building (Burj Khalifa); a sky center in the desert; the world's largest natural flowers garden (The Miracle Garden); indoor skiing in the heart of the Middle East; exquisite shopping malls; world class restaurants; sophisticated clubs and bars; and much, much more! 

How to Make Sure Teaching English Abroad is a Resume-Worthy Experience

By: Pouneh Eftekhari

When I was graduating from college, I had two study abroad experiences under my belt and a full-blown addiction to travel. All I wanted to do was buy a one-way ticket abroad and never come home. I only knew of two options to do so--teach English abroad and join the Peace Corps--but neither option seemed to get the approval of my parents. So I didn’t do either.

Instead, I appeased everyone and went to grad school...but I did it under my terms: in Europe! After two years of grad school and a short stint working full time abroad, I ended up back home...suppressing the travel bug by ‘getting a real job’ and ‘settling down’. Not long after I got married, my husband and I knew we needed an international adventure, but felt at a loss for how to make it happen. I threw out the idea of teaching English abroad, but neither of us took it very seriously.

Unfortunately, like many others, we held a prejudice that it wasn’t a ‘real job’ and that it was only for ‘recent college graduates who don’t want to get a real job’.

We tabled the idea until we couldn’t any longer.

Adjusting to Turkish Life: An American Woman in Ankara

By: Pouneh Eftekhari

Living and teaching English in Ankara, Turkey as a woman wasn't that different than living in Europe or the USA. I lived in a middle-upper class area, working with professionals (doctors, lawyers, university professors, government officials, engineers, etc.), many of whom had traveled internationally and, of course, were highly educated. On the surface, they seemed to be western in many regards. Having said that, they were, at the same time, fiercely patriotic and had so much pride in their culture and its traditions. It’s incredible to experience centuries-old traditions. But at the same time, parts of society and social norms tend to be..... a bit old-school. To be honest, sometimes those old-school mentalities were a bit hard to swallow for me, an independent woman from the west...