A Teacher in Taiwan and Some Life Lessons

By Jennifer Fernandez

I moved to Sanxia, Taiwan, September 2017. I had never taught ESL before and my only previous experience was as a Teacher Assistant. Needless to say, I was nervous to start working at Carden American school. Thankfully, a fellow ITA alumna, who helped me secure the job, trained me and made my transition a little easier. My first couple weeks were filled with mistakes and I lost a lot of confidence. Those mistakes helped me become a better teacher, coworker, roommate, and an overall better person. I learned how to keep open communication with my coworkers whose first language isn’t English. I practiced my patience with classes whose progress’ was slower than others. I practiced my compassion and empathy when students would tell me about their days filled with experiences I hadn’t had.

Getting Your Student Visa for Teaching English in Spain: The Details

By: Megan Zambell

Excited to start your adventures in Spain, but a little shaky on how exactly to get your student visa?!  There were some helpful blogs and people along the way, but I could’ve used guidance and reassurance on the specific items below:

Note: The following information should be helpful to those of you who are hoping to get a student visa for study in Spain, especially if you’re going through the New York consulate.  The NY consulate accepts applications from permanent residents of NY, NJ, PA, CT, or DE.

Is Teaching English in Hanoi, Vietnam Right for You?

By Rochelle Caruso

Hanoi is a mixture of old and new; it’s chaotic and polluted and one of my favorite places in the entire world. The Vietnamese are incredibly hardworking and resourceful. They have managed to rebuild their economy and country in under 40 years and are continuing that progress steadily. The expat community is heavily developed but doesn’t isolate you from the Vietnamese culture. Both the expats and Vietnamese are some of the most inclusive and happy people I have had the pleasure of knowing in my life, and I truly think that it would be difficult for a newcomer to not make friends. That being said, Hanoi is crazy in all aspects. The traffic, the pollution, and the social life can all be overwhelming, and if big cities are not your thing, I would recommend trying Hai Phong or other smaller provinces outside of the capital.

Five Tips for Your Best Trip to the Pyramids

By Eric Schenk 

If you are coming to Egypt to teach, you will, at some point, take the trek. It will either be the first thing you do when you hop off the plane, or, like me, it will take you a full five months before you get around to it.

I’m talking, of course, about the pyramids. The pyramids of Giza are some of the most amazing things you will ever see. Huge and golden and majestic in the sun, they are even more incredible than the pictures. Sometimes, pixels just can’t do history justice.

Espanniversary: How I've Changed Over One Year in Barcelona

By Kayla Anderson

Let’s start at the beginning. August 19, 2017: I’m sharing a bed with my mom, phone light furiously glowing at 1am as I read and re-read ITA Alumni stories regarding teaching English in Barcelona. I’ve never been to Spain. I studied design at University and have $2,000 in my bank account. I don’t know a lick of Spanish.

My one-way flight to Barcelona is 10 days away.