What is a Hagwon for Teaching English in South Korea?


By: Cassie Wells

South Korea is one of the largest and most popular job markets for those looking to teach English abroad. With thousands of opportunities spread throughout the country, you might be wondering who exactly your employer will be. While public schools employ a small amount of English teachers each year, the bulk of jobs will be found at Hagwons. “Hagwon” is the Korean language word for a for-profit private educational institute (school). So, essentially, hagwons are private language centers or academies that operate like businesses and apart from the South Korean public school system.

How Do U.S. Citizens Obtain a Criminal Background Check for Teaching English Abroad?


By: Jeff Penick

In general, if you’re planning on teaching English abroad, there is about a 50/50 chance you will need to obtain some kind of criminal background check before or during the hiring process. In some countries, a background check is required to qualify for a visa like in South Korea. In other cases, the individual school that hires you may request a background check.

Can I Secure a Job in Advance for Teaching English in Europe?


By: Havvah Holl 

Europe is a popular market for potential TEFL teachers, however, it can be daunting because most positions for non-EU teachers are secured locally on the ground after you’ve arrived in the country. While common practice, it doesn’t offer the same peace of mind as securing a position in advance, when you know that you have a job waiting for you. The good news is that if you are set on being in Europe, and prefer to have a job secured before heading overseas there are some great options available in a variety of top job markets.

What Does it Mean to "Break-Even" Financially While Teaching English Abroad?

By: Michael Kunik

As you embark on your research for your options for teaching English abroad, you will likely encounter the term "breaking even" with reference to salaries for English teachers overseas. Europe and Latin America are comprised of some of the most popular English teaching destinations in the world.  However, most English teachers living there only make enough money to “break even” each month. This means you can cover your bills (rent, food, ulitilies, transportation, etc.), support yourself, live comfortably, & enjoy your life abroad to the fullest, but you shouldn't expect to save money at the end of the month

 

Unfortunately, there are many misconceptions circling around the TEFL field about what kind of impact this financial fact will have on an English teacher’s experience abroad. Fortunately for you, I’ve taught in one of these markets (Madrid, Spain), and I know the truth about teaching English in a “break-even” country.