How Much Can I Save and Earn as an English Teacher in Vietnam?

By: Christie Koness

Vietnam is an excellent choice for teaching English overseas if you are not only hoping to have a very authentic teaching experience, but earn a good salary and put some cash away! While you may not make quite as much as South Korea or China or find a job with as many benefits, Vietnam still comes in pretty close as a top destination where even first-time English teachers can make and save great money.

What Are Salaries for Teaching English in South Korea?

How much money can you make teaching English in South Korea?

First-time English teachers in South Korea working in public schools through programs like EPIK typically earn monthly salaries between 1.5 to 3 million won ($1,150 - $2,650 USD).  English teachers at private schools (Hagwons) earn from 1.9 to 2.4 million won ($1,600 - $2,000 USD) monthly. Public & private schools typically provide free housing and flight reimbursements.

What are Salaries for English Teachers in Japan?

How much money can you make teaching English in Japan?

Most first-time English teachers in Japan get paid between 247,700 JPY ($2,250 USD) to 286,200 JPY ($2,600 USD) per month. First-year participants teaching English in Japan on the JET Program receive an average monthly wage of 280,000 JPY, ($2550 USD) per month with yearly pay increases. Airfare and housing costs are typically the teachers responsibility.

What are Salaries for English Teachers in Latin America?

By Jeff Penick

Salaries for English teachers in Latin America will vary from country to country mostly depending on the cost of living in the given country. With that said, as a general rule of thumb for the region, English teachers should expect to earn a salary large enough to live a middle class lifestyle by local standards, and for the most part, break even after expenses. That means you will typically make enough money to cover your expenses (rent, transportation, food, phone, utilities, etc.) & to enjoy going out and traveling on weekends, but you shouldn't expect to save substantial sums after expenses.

Key Point! The cost of living is substantially lower in most Latin American countries compared to native English speaking countries like the US, Canada, Australia, and the UK.  So even though your salary will tend to be lower, but you will still enjoy a good standard of living.  Also, any hard currency (dollars, euros, etc.) that you bring with you will have strong purchasing power in most Latin American countries and will "go farther."  This means that your start-up costs & travel will often be much cheaper.

How Much Money Can You Earn & Save Teaching English in Thailand? [Tips & Resources]

By: Shay Ames

What's left to be said about Thailand? As I'm interviewing an International TEFL Academy staff member - who we’ll call “Erika” - she gazes out the window’s display of winter wonder-Chicago-land, and dazedly reminisces about her experience, not long ago, teaching in a warm, magical place called Thailand that is also one of the top job markets for teaching English in Asia.  

Asia is known as one of the most lucrative regions in the world & while Thailand is not the most  developed economy in Asia, it is a nation on the move and many English teachers are able to make enough to save 30%-50% of their income after expenses.  

What Does it Mean to "Break-Even" Financially While Teaching English Abroad?

By: Michael Kunik

As you embark on your research for your options for teaching English abroad, you will likely encounter the term "breaking even" with reference to salaries for English teachers overseas. Europe and Latin America are comprised of some of the most popular English teaching destinations in the world.  However, most English teachers living there only make enough money to “break even” each month. This means you can cover your bills (rent, food, ulitilies, transportation, etc.), support yourself, live comfortably, & enjoy your life abroad to the fullest, but you shouldn't expect to save money at the end of the month

Unfortunately, there are many misconceptions circling around the TEFL field about what kind of impact this financial fact will have on an English teacher’s experience abroad. Fortunately for you, I’ve taught in one of these markets (Madrid, Spain), and I know the truth about teaching English in a “break-even” country.