A Day In the Life of a Student in the Guadalajara, Mexico TEFL Class

International TEFL Academy is proud to offer a world-class 4-week Guadalajara, Mexico TEFL course located in the heart of this historic city. Employing a state-of-the-art curriculum and taught by expert university-level instructors, this course is designed to provide you with the skills & qualification you need to succeed in teaching English abroad. This course is fun and you will learn a ton, but it is also very demanding and requires that you be prepared to meet the full-time demands of a rigorous university-level course. To help you prepare for this course, we've put together a typical day in the life schedule to outline the daily grind and commitment required. 

Teaching English in Public Schools in Chile Through the “English Opens Doors” Program

 

By: Michael Kunik

While it is true that the vast majority of English teaching positions available overseas are with private language schools, there are a variety of really popular government sponsored teaching programs that offer foreign instructors opportunities to teach in a public school setting. Among them is the “English Opens Doors” (EOD) program offered by The United Nations Development Program and the Chilean Ministry of Education for teaching English in Chile. The Chilean Ministry of Education recruits volunteers to teach in public schools in exchange for a modest stipend and a homestay with a local family.

10 Great Places You Must See While Teaching English in Chile

 


  • Thinking about teaching English abroad?
  • Want to discover the fantastic cultural, historical and natural offerings of Latin America while getting paid?
  • Do you want to live in a dynamic, cosmopolitan city offering world-class cuisine, nightlife and architecture?

Boasting one of the top job markets for teaching English in South America, the nation of Chile can be a great adventure for those who love to experience everything and anything from the driest desert in the world to glacial reserves, fantastic mountains, beautiful wine country and spectacular coastlines. For those who venture to teach English in Chile, here are ten gems you will want to be sure to experience.

Teach English in Buenos Aires & Discover the "Paris of South America"

Known as the "Paris of Latin America" and the "City of Fair Winds" (a literal translation from the city's Spanish name), the capital of Argentina, Buenos Aires, captures Latin America's passion for life perhaps more than any other city on the continent. From Tango, wine and amazing food, to exquisite Art Deco architecture and fútbol, Buenos Aires offers it all. This colorful city is the second largest metropolitan area in South America and it is located at the western shore of Rio de la Plata just across from Uruguay on the southeastern part of the continent.

Teaching English in Colombia: Public School Opportunities


By Doug Waxman

Note: This article was originally published on September 19, 2015. I has been updated and republished on March 30, 2017 for freshness & accuracy.

Looking to teach English in one of the most dynamic and beautiful nations in Latin America?

The Government of Colombia has recently announced a program to recruit Americans and other native English speakers to teach English in public schools throughout Colombia. This initiative provides a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for native English speakers to immerse themselves in the heart of Latin America while making a meaningful contribution to local communities across this beautiful nation.

5 Tips for Budget Travel in Latin America


By: Cassie Wells

Latin America offers some of the world's best in cuisine, nightlife, the outdoors, and also opportunities to become fluent in Spanish or Portuguese.  If you are teaching English in Latin America, traveling and exploring the region's culture and beauty will certainly be highlights of your experience. But, from the heights of Machu Picchu in Peru to the sun-kissed beaches of Costa Rica, it’s a lot of ground to cover and with a travel itinerary spanning multiple pages, you might worry that you’re bank account will cut your trip short. Here are some tips to keep your budget in check and your travel goals attainable.

Teaching English in Spain vs. Argentina: The Ultimate Throwdown

Spain vs. Argentina:

Two ITA Advisors Go Head-to-Head on
Which is Tops for Teaching English Abroad

By: Lauren Davis & Helen Schenck

Good evening and welcome to an ITA match-up that promises to be a clasico in every sense of the word. On one side of the world, measuring in with a mainland area of 2,780,400 km2 and some darn good chorizo, we have ARGENTINA….. And on the other side of the world, coming in as the sixth largest country in Europe with some tasty sangria to boot, we present SPAIN. And tonight's prize?

ETERNAL TEACHING GLORRRYYY!

Money Tips for Teaching In Argentina: Learn About The "Blue Market"


By Lindsay Campher Krasinski

So, you are thinking about teaching English in Argentina?  Learning about financial practices - from banking to giving tips - is a basic part of moving abroad, and nowhere is that more of the case than in Argentina. Understanding the Blue Market is a must before you go and could help you get more out of your money and out of your experience teaching English in Latin America

What is the Blue Market?

I’m an advisor, not an economist so I will try to make this article as simple and straight forward as I can.

Simply, the Blue Market is where you go in Buenos Aires to get the highest exchange rate for the foreign currency that you bring with you - in many countries, it might be considered the "black market." It's not technically legal or monitored by authorities, but it operates in the open and changing money in the Blue Market is considered routine.

The Argentinian Peso has fluctuated greatly in recent decades, and compared to the U.S. dollar, has lost approximately 90% of its value the past 10 years (officially).  Argentinians have experienced their bank accounts worth go up and down on a financial roller coaster and the weakness of the peso in global markets has led Argentinians to value the American dollar over the Argentinian peso. Bottom line: people want U.S. dollars!