Is Teaching English in Hanoi, Vietnam Right for You?

By Rochelle Caruso

Hanoi is a mixture of old and new; it’s chaotic and polluted and one of my favorite places in the entire world. The Vietnamese are incredibly hardworking and resourceful. They have managed to rebuild their economy and country in under 40 years and are continuing that progress steadily. The expat community is heavily developed but doesn’t isolate you from the Vietnamese culture. Both the expats and Vietnamese are some of the most inclusive and happy people I have had the pleasure of knowing in my life, and I truly think that it would be difficult for a newcomer to not make friends. That being said, Hanoi is crazy in all aspects. The traffic, the pollution, and the social life can all be overwhelming, and if big cities are not your thing, I would recommend trying Hai Phong or other smaller provinces outside of the capital.

The Pleasure of Teaching English to Adults in Vietnam

 

By: Meredith Clarke

I’ve never particularly liked kids. I’ve never babysat a day in my life. I have no younger siblings. Even growing up, most of my friends were at least a year or two older than me. I get along well with the occasional child at a wedding or family function, but more than one at a time and I start to feel overwhelmed.

From Peace Corps Reject to Head Montessori Teacher in Hanoi, Vietnam

By: Holly Grudovich

I started my online course at International TEFL Academy in September of 2018. This was a few months after my graduation from California State University, and the news of my recent application rejection from the Peace Corps. If you are familiar with this institution, you know it is highly competitive and a prestigious opportunity; one of which I was sure that I was going to meet the requirements. I had spent nearly four years at my university in preparation of my application and departure. I met with previous Peace Corps volunteers, attended seminars, and added heaps of extra volunteer work to make my resume sparkle.

[Video] Teach English in Asia - Ambassador Facebook Live

Are you interested in teaching English in Asia?

We've got you covered! In this video, ITA Ambassadors Summer, Amanda and Amber share their experience living and teaching in Thailand, Japan and online in Asia. Watch them talk about their TEFL certification course, why they decided to teach English in Asia, how they found their teaching job, making friends, visa processes and more! 

Teaching English Online in Da Nang, Vietnam with Amanda Kolbye [Video]

What's it like to live and teach English online from Vietnam?

Watch this video to see ITA Ambassador, Amanda Kolbye, share with us a day-in-her-life living and teaching English online from Da Nang, Vietnam.

In this video, Amanda covers: 

  • A tour of the area/city they live in
  • Her gym and price
  • What ITA TEFL course they took
  • A tour of her Da Nang apartment and where to find apartments for rent
  • Perks of teaching English online and country hopping
  • Vietnam visas
  • Main mode of transportation in Da Nang, Vietnam
  • Whether it's safe to drive in Vietnam
  • A breakdown of monthly expenses including rent, utilities, transport, food, groceries, phone, etc
  • Teaching English online with VIPKID and her schedule
  • The difference between living in Taiwan and Vietnam
  • Medical Insurance 

A Survival Guide to Moving Abroad to Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

By Laura Nalin

Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, also known as Saigon, will forever be one of my favorite places. It was a bit of a slow burn type of love on my end, and it did take awhile to acclimate myself with its culture and my surroundings, though. First off, the neighborhoods in Saigon are sprawling throughout the general region, which I found pretty shocking. There are 24 districts in total; seven of them are considered urban, seven others are numbered and the other five are considered the suburbs. This city is insanely massive, which I’m not sure many people know about.

5 Things I Wish I Knew Before Moving to Vietnam to Teach English

By Laura Nalin

Moving abroad tends to be a bit unnerving at times as most of us embarking on the adventure are often weary of the “other side.” While Vietnam isn’t as scary as some of my elder family members conjectured, I’ll admit that it does feel like a different world, particularly in the beginning. Here are a few things I wish I knew when I first moved here, that I know now.

A Typical Weekend for an ESL Teacher in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

By Laura Nalin

I’m not really sure it’s possible for me to sum up a typical weekend in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam as such a thing doesn’t really exist; I’ll give it a go, anyhow. For starters, I have a pretty sweet gig and do not have to work on the weekends. I consider myself quite lucky as weekends are the busiest days for most teachers here in Saigon. With that said, there are generally a few things that I tend to do on a routinely basis. During my first year in the city, I tried to see as many of the tourist attractions as I could; now I either treat the weekends just the same as I would back in the states or travel to a nearby town if I’m up for it.

How to Get Around Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

By Laura Nalin

A few years ago I almost didn’t consider moving to Southeast Asia purely out of fear that I wouldn’t know how to get around Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. I was pretty dead set on relocating to Taiwan as there was a guaranteed, well-connected public transportation system in place. However, the pull of Vietnam was too strong and so I decided to fearlessly take the hectic city head-on. The main reason I was skeptical about moving to Saigon is because of a motorbike accident I’d gotten into in 2014 in a small northern town called Mai Chau.