Teaching In-Company Classes vs. Teaching in an Academy in Spain

By: Haley Castelvecchi

When I first arrived in Madrid, I knew I was going to have to take whatever job was offered to me. I didn’t have much experience except for my online International TEFL Academy certification course and some extra help from TTMadrid. To my surprise, I landed a job quite quickly with a consultant group that coordinated teachers and in-company classes. If you’re unfamiliar, these types of classes are when teachers travel to business and provide a lesson for adults during their normal workday. They are quite common here in Madrid, as knowing English is becoming increasingly important in many business jobs.

The Friends You Make Along the Way

By: Jackie Kosovich

I began my journey of moving abroad by taking the ITA Online TEFL Course. During that time, I had no idea where I wanted to move except to Europe. I had a couple friends already living in Europe in the Czech Republic, Germany, and the United Kingdom. However, I decided to move to Spain because I wanted to learn a new language, and Spanish made the most sense being from the States. I originally wanted to move to Barcelona because of the beach and because I had heard amazing things. However, I could not find a way to live there legally. After a discussion with ITA Student Affairs about where to move, they recommended their TEFL Class in Madrid, Spain, in which I could obtain my student visa. With that, I decided to move to Madrid.

What Happens When You Catch the Travel Bug Early

By: Sophia Skaff

What inspired me to teach abroad?

I grew up in a multi-cultural family. My mom is Greek, and my dad is Lebanese-American. Both cultures were entwined into my home life. My mom always cooked amazing Greek and Lebanese food. We would spend summer vacations in Greece to visit my grandparents and other family members. I loved everything about those trips, the different foods, people, and language. The beauty of Greece with its crystal-clear waters and white stucco houses. As well as the small mountain-side village where my grandparents lived. There, I would pick fresh figs from the trees and play with my grandma’s kittens in the beautiful grape-vine covered garden.

On Finding Yourself: Insight Into Associated Wanderlust Clichés


 

By: Dana Crosby

I wasn’t able to study abroad in college, so after graduation, my top priority was to live abroad for an extended period of time. Teaching abroad seemed like the most sustainable, feasible option. I enrolled in International TEFL Academy’s online course, worked two jobs to save enough cushion money until I had a consistent paycheck, and set my sites on Hanoi, Vietnam. It was high time for me to “find myself,” “get out of my comfort zone,” “scratch the travel itch,” and “find a cure for my wanderlust”. This is a story about clichés.

People will talk to you about how good it is to “get out of your comfort zone”, and (spoiler alert!!) it is. But why? The answer is multi-faceted, so I want to focus on the role of personal identify in creating one’s comfort zone and how it’s affected when we exit said comfort zone.

How Do You Say Spanish in Chinese?

By: Jessica Stanton

So Jess, what’s next? That’s the question everyone seems to ask as soon as I’ve gotten completely comfortable with what’s now. I’ve gotten so used to saying “I don’t know” it spills out of my mouth even when I do know sometimes.

Once I decided to change careers from medical assistant turned hairstylist & bartender to teach English abroad, I knew I’d end up teaching English in China. During my online TEFL course at ITA, my cultural sensitivity essay focused on just that. What I didn’t know was that my road to the Far East would begin in South America.

A Tale of Two Schools in Honduras

By: James Hogan

It was the same country but worlds apart. Throughout the course of last year, I frequently couldn’t help but compare the school where I worked to the school in the city only a two hours drive to the west where I had worked the two years prior to that. Everything from the buildings to the quality of materials to the students themselves was very different. And yet I know that my life was the better for having had such varied experiences. I had first gotten a taste of what it was like to teach English abroad when I spent three months as a volunteer in a school in Romania. Through a series of circumstances, I found myself teaching English in a rough neighborhood in the capital city of Honduras, Tegucigalpa. I had visited the country twice before but only for several weeks. I soon found out that daily life in a third-world country was to be very different than several weeks spent visiting one.

How Teaching English Abroad Helped Me Figure Out My Career

By: Aimee Lam

Coming back was hard. After teaching abroad for a semester in Ayutthaya, Thailand, I was not only experiencing culture shock but also homesickness for a place that wasn’t home anymore. In fact, I no longer knew what home was. Earlier in the year, I had been taking the online course with International TEFL Academy and making plans to teach abroad. I had been living in New York City and was so done with it. When I got hired to teach in Ayutthaya, I saw it as an opportunity to start over and turn a new leaf. I left my job in book publishing (with high school textbooks) and sublet my Manhattan apartment in the hopes of a fresh start.

Living a Memorable Life: My Teaching Journey from Latin America to Spain

By: Laura Hoppe

La vida no es la que uno vivió, sino la que uno recuerda y cómo la recuerda para contarla. Gabriel García Márquez (known as “Gabo”), one of Colombia’s most beloved authors, once wrote this very sentence. “What matters in life is not what happens to you but what you remember and how you remember it.”

 

Living in Galicia, Spain

By: Matt Mitzel

October, 2015. I was half-way through the fall semester of my junior year at the University of Maryland with winter break around the corner. My previous winter breaks had been nothing but boring and uneventful as I found it difficult to find a job for only a few weeks. I had no plans to study abroad as I was not as interested as other college students and frankly didn’t try to fit it in my schedule. My parents would have liked to have seen me study abroad, but again, I exhibited a lack of interest. This winter break would be different as I knew that I wanted to go somewhere because my college career would be completed within a year and a half. When else would I be able to travel without having to worry about the responsibilities and constraints of my adult life? After discussing with my parents and a distant cousin in Germany, I decided to book a ticket to Europe for the upcoming January. I would be going solo and viewed this as an experience to see the world and I guess the cliché “find myself”. I returned from my trip just in time for the spring semester and I discovered my true passion: traveling and seeing the world and its many cultures.

My Journey: Teaching English Online While Traveling Around Europe

By: Noa Ben Haim

Who doesn’t love traveling? Seeing exciting places, sipping local beers, experiencing new cultures, tastes, music, and meeting a ton of people (other travelers as well as locals) wherever you go… what’s not to like? But working and traveling by and large don’t go together; not every job will allow you to just get up and leave for months, and the ones that will — will probably also make you kiss your paychecks goodbye until you get back.

But there’s an alternative: taking your job with you! And in this case it’s convenient, not very time consuming, and doesn’t really feel like a job anyway. Sounds good, right? I’ll be honest… it’s actually great! Plus, even though it’s all-too-easy these days to find budget-friendly hostels and means of transportation, it’s nice to keep getting paid while traveling.