A Semi-Vegetarian Grocery Shopaholic’s Guide to Food Shopping in Seoul

By: Holly DeMuth

Technically, I’m a pescetarian, a designation so rarely referenced in print that my spell check doesn’t even recognize the word. This means that I eat vegetarian, except that I also eat seafood. Eggs, dairy, etc. are fine. Meat that doesn’t come out of the ocean is not. My reasons for this are boring and not relevant here, so I’ll skip to the useful bits.

 

She Could Hear Them Crack Her Tooth? Dental Care in South Korea

By: Katie McKindley

South Korea is a hub for plastic surgery, and I’d seen videos of foreigners getting LASIK done. How much different is dental care? They’ve got to be rigorously trained and highly valued, right? This is Asia, after all, where studiousness is next to godliness. I tried getting my three wisdom teeth removed in the states before I moved, but I didn’t have enough time, or the right insurance. So, after taking ITA’s Online TEFL Course, getting employed by EPIK, and moving to South Korea, it’s been on my radar.

Teaching English in Geochang, South Korea with Tim Unaegbu [Video]

What's it like to live and teach English in South Korea?

Watch this video to see ITA Alumni Ambassador, Tim Unaegbu, share with us a day-in-his-life living and teaching English in Geochang, South Korea

In this video, Tim covers: 

  • What visa he teaches English on in Korea
  • Work/school attire
  • Classroom teaching assistants
  • Number of classes/schools taught at per week
  • Introduces us to his students
  • Average total monthly expenses in terms of rent, utilities, phone, groceries, transportation, etc
  • Recruiters
  • Classroom syllabuses
  • Learning Korean and how it can benefit you
  • The visa process
  • Public school contracts and what free things are provided to you (allowance)
  • The social aspects of living in Korea  

Follow the Thread

By:  Michelle Moon

I stepped into the warm night air off the bus from the airport. It was around Saturday midnight at downtown Southern Cross Station. I had finally arrived in Melbourne, Australia. I was dazed for a moment. Why was it so quiet and clean? There were straight lines and cold concrete architecture. For some reason, the stillness and rigidity of the city was unsettling. I had taught English for three years in Seoul, South Korea. After my third contract had ended, I traveled around Asia for three months with Nepal being the last stop before jetting off to Melbourne under a working holiday visa. Thamel, Nepal was the complete opposite to Melbourne from what I could see; Thamel was dusty, loud, chaotic, crowded with narrow roads. It was a living river of sounds, sights, and smells, and I had loved every minute of it.

Unexpected Outcomes

By: Michael Geer

In the fall of 2014, I left the United States. I said goodbye to my friends and family and headed off to South Korea for a new career in teaching. It was a terrifying leap into the unknown. I flew with the intention to make my expat life temporary, two years tops. Then I’d come home and figure out the next phase of my career.

Five year later I left Korea, but I didn’t go home to the States. I came to China.