Leaving the Classroom for Online Flexibility

By: David Peña 

Exhausted and over it, I was ready to leave my 40 hour per week classroom job for more flexibility and travel. When moving abroad to teach English, I did not expect to have such a rigid schedule, with dozens of outside responsibilities. I wasn’t just planning classes, but somehow I got roped into teaching a homeroom class and working closely with parents and school system drudgery. I was tired and had little time to travel and experience the fun and exciting parts of teaching English abroad.

Follow Me to Turkey

By: Ana Santos

I fell in love with Turkey!

As a researcher in the tourism field, and being that Turkey is the only European country with a view over Asia, a developed country full of opportunities in all kinds of business, amazing transport connections and truly friendly people, it was obviously the best choice. Turkey is at the top of the tourism chain, ranking worldwide and it should be evident why. Turkey is a country that knows a great deal about tourism and hospitality, and I am aware I have much to learn from them. Also as a non-native English speaker, I believe I could find good arguments as a potential teacher as English is not the first language used in the country. 

The director of the school in Istanbul gave me the great honor of accepting me as the only Non-native English teacher and so far, so good! Highly qualified teachers have helped give me the confidence to achieve the goals in order to become a non-native English teacher. Improving takes the guts to look for criticism as well as the courage to write, and the time and patience to voice in another language. Besides, going abroad is a great experience for any student and with such diversity and activities, as well as tourism, on offer from Turkey was certainly the best option.