Taking it One Step at a Time - Moving to Dusseldorf, Germany

By: Hannah Fox

I couldn’t believe it. Amidst a heavy slew of German words, I realized that my visa application was being accepted. Here we all were, smiling in this small, sunlit office, me now ready to navigate the professional world as an official, legal employee in Germany. There were moments during the meeting when I was certain my application would be rejected. I hadn’t filled out the correct immigration form; the health coverage I had purchased was too short-term; yet, I could see smiles on the faces of those in the room. My world was effectively draped in silence, as all the words I could hear were straight gibberish. When I left the office with my visa officially stamped in my passport, I couldn’t believe my luck.

The Best Decision - TEFL Certification in Chicago

By: Kimmy Nguyen

 

College graduate, licensed cosmetologist, licensed stock broker, and now…I can now add the title of “Certified TEFL (Teaching English as a Foreign Language) Teacher” to my strange string of skills and qualifications. I’ve realized by now that I am a complicated individual. I go into one profession and onto the next because I get bored easily. I like to be challenged. No, I NEED to be challenged.

So when it came time for me to make a decision about how to get TEFL certified, it only felt right to choose the route that would challenge me the most. That meant that I would need to max out my credit cards to fly out to Chicago for four weeks to complete the TEFL course in person.

Traveling in Developing Countries: You Won't Know Until You Go

By: Kelly Martin

When I was doing my online TEFL class with International TEFL Academy, I was dreaming of beaches and classy resorts. After doing some exploring in the world, it turns out that developing countries are by far my preference. Unexpectedly to me, Cambodia has my heart over anywhere else. Countries that are still a work in progress have the biggest hearts, amazing food, best prices, and they’re definitely the most interesting. But there are some things I didn’t know was going to happen. These things can throw you off balance at times, but they’re actually the best parts.

Here are 8 things I didn’t realize before I ran off into developing countries and what I learned from them:

How Teaching English in China Taught Me Not to Settle

By: Jessica Addington

I have always been a “pleaser” as my family lovingly calls me. I am the mediator. I am the happy camper. The person who makes sure that everyone is doing fine and dandy at the expense of my own wants and needs. I have always been that way, and most of the time I see it as a good quality, one that should be appreciated because I want to contribute to others’ happiness and well being. It is part of who I am. However, as I have gotten older and a little bit wiser, and especially since traveling abroad, I have realized that this is a quality that is not always a good thing. I realized that I was not speaking up for myself and what I wanted. I was not putting myself first. That all began to change when I went to teach English abroad in China.

5 Things That Surprised Me About Living in Costa Rica

Teaching English in Costa Rica

By: Caroline Chadwell

Two months in Costa Rica has flown by faster than any adventure I've ever undertaken. It's a strange feeling settling in one area, telling yourself that this is your new home for awhile, reminding yourself that even though it's a long time, to use the time wisely. 

I remember my first extended stay adventure in California thinking, "I'll be here for four months, and then I'll go home and look for a job." Those four months turned into two years and I have this sinking feeling that it could happen here as well.

The Reality of Teaching English in Cambodia

By: Kelly Martin

I moved to a country I knew nothing about. It’s a country the world definitely doesn’t know enough about. Using the small dose of confidence I gained from International TEFL Academy’s online TEFL certification course, I agreed to live with a local family in a Cambodian village to teach little kids and adults English.

The Manhunt: How I Got My Students to Actually Come to Class

By: Maylin Enamorado

I looked around at the empty classroom before me. There were about seven students in total, all staring at me nervously. I checked my attendance list once again, thinking I had made a mistake. On a single sheet of paper, I double-checked the class period and saw that there was no error. I was supposed to have 28 students this period. As I took attendance, I must have had a nervous look on my face because one student got up and put her hand on my shoulder and said, most students dont come to English classthey just dont really care about it, ya know?

Why I Started the 'English from A to Z' Online English Teaching Website

By: Ben Weinberg

I never thought that I would become an ESL teacher. It wasn’t one of those set plans that I had for myself from an early age. Sometimes, life can’t be predicted and you end up being somewhere else than you originally intended. I think that this happens for the better most times, and I can say for certain that my life has been better off with my past experiences of teaching English as a Second Language. It’s been a roller coaster ride but a fun and exciting one at that.